CBBM was founded on the notion that it is not enough simply to save an endangered species, or to restore a nearby forest or waterway. The separation of conservationists from local and indigenous people, and of all humans from the other communities of flora & fauna is a cartesian dualistic mistake that creates biodominance, not a sustainable biosynergistic process.

We seek to foster global person-centered biosynergy, striving to transform human biodomination into biosynergy so that solutions to today’s environmental problems are holistic in design and implementation. Our approach is to work with local and indigenous communities to co-design long-term action-research and intervention programs aimed at restoring biosynergy in threatened ecosystems and biodiversity hotspots.

Board members

Our Board of Directors is comprised of avid conservationists and sustainable development professionals whose hearts are truly devoted to person-centered conservation. They come from many walks of life but dedicate their free time to helping CBBM achieve its vision of enabling person-centered conservation solutions.

Sheila Tucker

Sheila is an educator, writer, and evaluator with an MSc in Education for Sustainability. She has managed UK government-funded projects, written resources for global justice and sustainability in schools, and trained student teachers at Cambridge University and educators in the UK and internationally. In 2021 she co-authored ‘Shared Ground’ a training about Refugees and evaluated ‘At The Heart of Communities’ an EU Erasmus project in Italy, Spain, Turkey, Finland, and the UK.

Denis Ndeloh

Denis Ndeloh is the founder and President of CBBM. He holds a doctorate degree in Human Ecology at the Vrije University of Brussels, Belgium. He has extensive experience in the study and conservation of Cross River gorillas in Cameroon. He has also worked with Ba’aka pygmies in East Cameroon on great apes conservation and livelihood issues. He is currently Director of Wildlife at the Nunavut Wildlife Management Board, in Nunavut, Canada.

Dieudonne Alemangi

Dieudonne holds a doctorate degree in Environmental and Resource Management from Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus, Germany. He has published extensively on community forestry and sustainable forest management in Cameroon and other countries in the Congo Basin. He is currently a Senior Manager with FOKABS Inc. in Ottawa, Canada. Prior to that, he was a scientist with the International Center for Research in Agroforestry (ICRAF) at its regional office in Yaounde, Cameroon.

Thomas Khumbah

Thomas is a graduate of the Faculty of Agronomy and Agricultural Sciences, University of Dschang, Cameroon where he earned a Masters in Agricultural Engineering in 1989. He served the Government of Cameroon Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development for 30 years in many capacities including Divisional Delegate of Agriculture, Registrar of Cooperatives and Common Initiative Groups (Coop GIC), sub Director for projects and planning, and sub Director for Community Development.

Anthony L. Rose

Anthony L. Rose

Dr. Anthony Rose is the founder & CEO of Biosynergy Institute, founder of Center for Studies of the Person (CSP) & Director of Biosynergy Project at CSP. He is a biosynergist, social scientist, author & social change systems developer. He has designed & implemented person-centered innovations in biosynergy science, wildlife conservation, organization & community development, health care quality assurance, drug abuse prevention, education, religion & more. Dr. Rose has published books, articles, educational films, and documentaries in all these arenas.

Simon Hoyte

Simon is an Environmental Anthropologist and Ph.D candidate at the University College of London, UK. His work combines techniques from participatory action research with hunter-gatherer ethnography to address issues of forest degradation and environmental injustice amongst Baka hunter-gatherers in southeastern Cameroon, Central Africa. Simon is an advocate for indigenous-led biocultural conservation strategies, whereby ‘nature’ and ‘culture’ are integrated, and local community collaboration is celebrated.